THE ROYAL

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Hoorah for Prince Harry as he quashes the stiff upper lip. The most famous redhead in the world is certainly stirring things up. If he’s not announcing that no one really wants the pomp and ceremony of carrying the crown, he’s ushering his decidedly un-royal girlfriend around the Science Museum after hours. Yet, despite being mischievous, the fifth-in-line to the throne also does very good work for the Lesotho-based Sentebale charity and the Invictus Games. Now, he’s also added mental health to his portfolio and is talking openly about life’s difficulties. If you hang out at the Wholefoods on Kensington High Street, and you may spot Meghan Markle shopping for supper for two.


FOR SPEED FREAKS

Think of it as the Ascot for cars. The Goodwood Festival of Speed, staged every year since 1993, features more than 600 cars across various different classes and ages. This year, Goodwood celebrates the 110th anniversary of Brooklands, the racing circuit that is said to be the birthplace of British motorsport. The festival will showcase an array of illustrious cars and bikes from throughout the circuit’s history. Other highlights include the Moving Motor Show, the Michelin Supercar Paddox, and the Cartier Style et Luxe concours d’elegance. The latter includes some of the most beautiful cars in the world, and last year the judging panel included Jonathan Ive, Viscount Linley, and Lapo Elkann. goodwood.com

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THE DESIGNER

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A royal wedding can catapult a designer to stratospheric heights, and that’s exactly what happened when Pippa Middleton chose Giles Deacon to create her wedding dress. Deacon, a Central Saint Martins graduate, has paid his dues, working around the ready-to-wear circuit, and completing stints at Jean Charles De Castelbajac, Bottega Veneta, and Emanuel Ungaro. The designer, known for his creative and eccentric style, closed his eponymous ready-to-wear store in 2016, opting for a couture-only atelier with 50 or so select clients. For Middleton, he created a dress that was definitively English — made from a single sheath of lace, embroidered with tiny pearls, and finished with a soft tulle underskirt. The dress is restrained, with subtle drama, a depth of quality, and a flounce of romance that is reminiscent of the Visconti era: and it obviously came with a price to match. giles-deacon.com


THE CITY HOTEL

Good news for fans of the original Soho House. The latest opening from the group that continues to branch out, with satellite properties in cities across the globe, is The Ned. This glossy, five-star hotel in the former Grand Banking Hall in the City of London is working hard to change the city’s go-to drinking, eating, and sleeping options. The Grade 1 listed building, designed by Edwin “Ned” Luytens (who also designed the Johannesburg Art Gallery), is now home to 252 bedrooms, a central courtyard on the ground floor, and nine top-notch restaurants — including a city-based Cecconi’s, and. The roof-top bars and terraces are members-only, but it’s definitely worth blagging your way in, if only for the view. thened.com

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THE COUNTRY RETREAT

When the original Pig opened in Brockenhurst, New Forest, it revolutionised the great British institution of the country-house hotel. The first Pig, founded by former Hotel du Vin and Soho House executive Robin Hutson, kept the cabbage chintz of former days, but added a splash of shabby-chic — and with it a great deal of cool. Add to that an epic kitchen garden that dictates daily menus and you have a modern take on a traditional institution. The group has expanded to include a Pig in the Wall (Hampshire), a Pig at the Beach (Dorset), a Pig near Bath (Somerset), and a Pig at Combe (Devon). thepighotel.com

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GETTING OUT THERE

Everyone loves an outdoor movie. Perhaps it’s some­thing do with nostalgia for the good old drive-in or the freedom of doing something completely impulsive. This summer, City Cruises, in association with Time Out, is taking it a step further and hosting screenings aboard a boat sailing down the Thames. Classic movies include Back to the Future, Casablanca, and When Harry Met Sally. There are also films with a London theme, includ­ing Love, Actually and Mary Poppins. Guests are invited on board for sunset snacks and drinks before the movie starts at sundown — as it’s the English summer, this can be any time after 10pm. And, in typical UK style, come rain or shine the movie will go ahead, so rain jackets are obligatory. citycruises.com/special-events/timeout-movies-on-the-river

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THE CAR

The classic British Mini, first produced by the British Motor Corporation (BMC) in 1959, was designed as a result of the 1956 Suez Crisis, which reduced oil supplies, and forced the UK government to introduce petrol rationing. As a result, the market for smaller cars boomed and the BMC quickly realised they had to produce a small vehicle fast. Named after the Latin word “minimus”, which means “the smallest”, the original Mini was designed by Alec Issigonis and was the first car ever to have a front-wheel-drive. Mick Jagger reportedly had one of the earlier models, while Madonna was spotted in a later redesign whizzing around the UK. The original Mini was a classic for almost half a century; the new Mini, launched in 2001, has become equally loved. miniselect.co.za

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THE VOYEUR EXPERIENCE

If ever a gal had a lot of swag, it would have to be Queen Elizabeth II. Over her 65-year reign, the Queen has consistently been given gifts, and it is customary for the non-perishable gifts worth more than £150 to be included in the royal collection. A selection of these will be on display when Buckingham Palace opens for the summer. Among the moreunusual gifts is a totem pole carved by the Kwakiutl people of Canada, which she received during a visit in 1971. It features a mythical thunder­bird, believed to bring thunder by flapping its wings. More abstract — and definitely more difficult to display — is the 437 708km² of Antarctica that was named after the Queen in celebration of her Diamond Jubilee. royalcollection.org.uk/visit/the-state-rooms-buckingham-palace

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THE SHOP

No trip to Central London is complete without a turn about the ancient Tudor building on the corner of Carnaby and Regent streets. Make sure you enter Liberty of London through the Great Marlborough Street entrance and you’ll pass buckets of the most beautiful blooms, belonging to florist Nikki Tibbles. Once you’ve inhaled their sweet scent, walk into the accessories department and head straight for the Rockins stand. It’s run by former Vivienne Westwood and Agent Provocateur executive Jessica Morris, and the Rockins skinny silk scarves are the only wind-arounds for this season. Grab a Turquoise Tropicalia Scarf, a Liberty limited-edition, inspired by the drawings of William Morris, and the tropical birds Jimi Hendrix famously released into Carnaby Street in the sixties. If, however, it’s fragrance you’re after, turn left and enter beauty-product nirvana. Liberty boasts one of the largest Le Labo counters in the country, and there are also many exclusive, limited-run treasures on offer, including the cult Votary facial oil and the insanely divine Byredo Heliotropa scent, which is deep with gardenia and Somalia incense top notes. libertylondon.com/uk/home

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